Mathomathis - Vymanika Shastras
Mathomathis – Vymanika Shastras

Mathomathis would like to present an article on Vimana Shastras or Vymanika Shastras written by the author by Maharshi Bharadwaaja Propounded by Venerable SUBBARAYA SHASTRY Translated into English and Edited, Printed and Published by G.R. JOSYER SCHOLAR, HISTORIAN, ESSAYIST, SANSKRITIST Printed at CORONATION PRESS, MYSORE-4, INDIA. The following article presented in mathomathis was adopted from the website In the following materials, we would constantly using the word author and readers needs to be aware off that author in the following context would be Josyer.

Author describes the book is as follows: Sometime in the period just before World War I, a Brahmana named Pandit Subbaraya Sastry began to dictate previously unknown texts in Sanskrit which purported to contain ancient Indian technological knowledge. He in turn, credited a Vedic sage named Maharshi Bharadwaja, as well as other Rishis who appear in legitimate Hindu texts. One of these ‘channeled’ texts was, on its face, a technical manual for the construction and use of ‘vimanas,’ the flying machines of the Vedic sagas. It is unclear as to whether any part of the present work was actually published in print at that time, even though it is implied in the introduction, so it is unclear whether it was published (in the legal sense) prior to 1923. The Sanskrit manuscript of the VS lay unpublished for over fifty years. In 1973, this text was published in a very limited edition by G.R. Josyer, along with a translation which he had produced over a twenty year period. In 1991, the English portion and the illustrations from the Josyer book were reprinted in the above-mentioned Vimana Aircraft of Ancient India & Atlantis.

It as if someone in the early 20th century wrote a 100 page book on ancient aircraft in Biblical Hebrew and attributed it to Moses and other prophets. However, the fact that the book was originally written in Sanskrit, while very impressive, isn’t any indication of authenticity. Sanskrit is to some extent still a living language, used everyday in Vedic ritual. It is plausible that a well-educated high-caste Brahmins from that period would be able to compose a Sanskrit text of this length given enough time. If you are looking for an ancient manuscript on this fascinating topic, you’ll need to keep on looking. The Vymanika Shastra was first committed to writing between 1918 and 1923, and nobody is claiming that it came from some mysterious antique manuscript. The fact is, there are no manuscripts of this text prior to 1918, and nobody is claiming that there are. So on one level, this is not a hoax. You just have to buy into the assumption that ‘channeling’ works.

On the other hand, there is no exposition of the theory of aviation (let alone antigravity). In plain terms, the VS never directly explains how vimanas get up in the air. The text is top-heavy with long lists of often bizarre ingredients used to construct various subsystems. This includes items such as monkey skin, eagle bones, sea-foam, and many that are only named in Sanskrit. Often the recipes are a mix of plant, animal and mineral ingredients, and involve mixing these ingredients and cooking them at high temperature in a furnace shaped like an animal, such as a frog. One wonders whether we are talking about metallurgy here, or some kind of alchemy. Most of the systems are described as mechanical devices, powered by steam, electricity or even solar power; a number literally involve smoke and mirrors. Vimanas are widely described in the genuine ancient texts such as the Ramayana and Mahabharata, as well as other later texts such as the dramas of Kalidasa. They are not metaphors or hyperbole, nor do you have to be a god to own or ride one as in other mythologies.

[Source: wikipedia] The Sanskrit word vi-māna (विमान) literally means “measuring out, traversing” or “having been measured out”. Monier Monier-Williams defines Vimana as “a car or a chariot of the gods, any self-moving aerial car sometimes serving as a seat or throne, sometimes self-moving and carrying its occupant through the air; other descriptions make the Vimana more like a house or palace, and one kind is said to be seven stories high”, and quotes the Pushpaka Vimana of Ravana as an example. It may denote any car or vehicle, especially a bier or a ship as well as a palace of an emperor, especially with seven stories. In some Indian languages like TamilMalayalamTelugu, and Hindi, vimana or vimanam means “aircraft”, for example in the town name Vimanapura (a suburb of Bangalore) and Vimannagar, a town in Pune. In another context, Vimana is a feature in Hindu temple architecture. [Source: wikipedia]

Either the way, in the following article, we would describe vimanas as: “aircrafts”, flying vehicles. The pictures shown below are some of the types of vimanas

Mathomathis - Tripura Vimana 103
Mathomathis – Tripura Vimana
Mathomathis - Tripura Vimana 102
Mathomathis – Tripura Vimana
Mathomathis - Tripura Vimana 102
Mathomathis – Tripura Vimana
Mathomathis - Sundara Vimana 102
Mathomathis – Sundara Vimana
Mathomathis - Sundara Vimana 101
Mathomathis – Sundara Vimana
Mathomathis - Shanukna Vimana 104
Mathomathis – Shanukna Vimana
Mathomathis - RukmaVimana 104
Mathomathis – Rukma Vimana
Mathomathis - RukmaVimana102
Mathomathis – Rukma Vimana
Mathomathis - RukmaVimana 103
Mathomathis – Rukma Vimana
Mathomathis - RukmaVimana 101
Mathomathis – Rukma Vimana
Mathomathis - Electric Power Generator
Mathomathis – Electric Power Generator
Mathomathis - Shanukna Vimana 102
Mathomathis – Shanukna Vimana
Mathomathis - Shanukna Vimana 103
Mathomathis – Shanukna Vimana
Mathomathis - Shanukna Vimana 101
Mathomathis – Shanukna Vimana

G. R. JOSYER Hon. Director, International Academy of Sanskrit Research writes the following lines (Note: None of the words have been edited). On 25-8-1952 the Mysore representative of the Press Trust of India, Sri N. N. Sastry, sent up the following report which was published in all the leading dailies of India, and was taken up by Reuter and other World Press News Services: “Mr. G. R. Josyer, Director of the International Academy of Sanskrit Research in Mysore, in the course of an interview, showed some very ancient manuscripts which the Academy had collected. He claimed that the manuscripts were several thousands of years old, compiled by ancient rishis, Bharadwaja, Narada and others, dealing, not with the mysticism of ancient Hindu philosophy of Atman or Brahman, but with more mundane things vital for the existence of man and progress of nations both in times of peace and war.

“Mr. Josyer’s manuscripts dealt in elaborate detail about food processing from various indigenous materials like grass, vegetables and leaves for human consumption, particularly during times of famine. “One manuscript dealt with Aeronautics, construction of various types of aircraft for civil aviation and for warfare. He showed me plans prepared according to directions contained in the manuscript on Aeronautics of three types of aircraft or Vimanas, namely, Rukma, Sundara and Shakuna Vimanas. Five hundred slokas or stanzas dealing with these go into such intricate details about choice and preparation of metals that would be suitable for various parts of vimanas of different types, constructional details, dimensions, designs and weight they could carry, and purposes they could be used for. “Mr. Josyer showed some types of designs and drawing of a helicopter-type cargo-loading plane, specially meant for carrying combustibles and ammunition, passenger aircraft carrying 400 to 500 persons, double and treble-decked aircraft. Each of these types had been fully described. “In the section giving about preparation and choice of metals and other materials that should go into such construction of aircraft, details were specified that the aircraft, (these metals are of 16 different alloys), must be “unbreakable, which cannot be cut through, which would not catch fire, and cannot be destroyed by accidents.” Details as to how to make these vimanas in flight invisible through smoke screens are given in Vimana Shastra of Maharshi Bharadwaja. “Further description and method of manufacturing aircraft, which will enable pilots not only to spot enemy aircraft, but also to hear what enemy pilots in their planes were speaking, on principles akin to radar, have all been given in elaborate detail with suitable explanatory notes. There are total of 8 chapters written by author which deals with construction of aircraft, which fly in air, go under water, or float on water.

TRAINING OF PILOTS: “A few slokas deal with qualifications and training of pilots to man these aircraft. These ancient types of aircraft are provided with necessary cameras to take pictures of approaching enemy planes. Yet another set of slokas deals with the kind of food and clothing to be provided for pilots to keep them efficient and fit in air flying conditions. “Mr. Josyer said he was attempting to publish these manuscripts suitably translated in English. “Another manuscript dealt with ancient Indian architecture, fully illustrated to facilitate construction. This treatise is ascribed to Maharshi Narada, and gives elaborate details about choice of constructional material for various types of buildings, even 15 storeys high. Sectional drawing has also been provided. A few chapters deal with construction of villages, cities and towns, fortresses, palaces and temples. This manuscript is full of plans and engineering constructional details to guide engineers. “Yet another manuscript from which Mr. G. R. Josyer read out passages referred to preparation of imitation diamonds and pearls. He also showed me another remarkable manuscript which deals in detail about food processing for invalids, for youth and for old and debilitated persons.”

“Vymaanika Shastra” consists of nearly 6000 lines, or 3000 verses of lucid Sanskrit, dealing with the construction of Vimanas or Aeroplanes. That the vocabulary of ancient Sanskrit could in simple flowing verse depict the technical details with effortless ease is a tribute to the language, and the greatness of the author. Maharshi Bharadwaja is an august name in the pantheon of Hindu Sages who recorded Indian civilization, in the spiritual, intellectual, and scientific fields in the hoary past. They transmitted knowledge from mouth to mouth, and from ear to ear, for long eras. Written transmission through birch-backs or palm-leaves, or home-made paper, are from this side of a thousand years. Even they are to be found in mangled forms owing to the depredation of time, weather and insect hordes. There is no-written material for the vast volume of Vedas, Upanishads, Shastras, and Puranas, which have come down for over 10000 years as a patrimony, not only for India, but for mankind in general. They remain embedded in the ether of the sky, to be revealed–like television,–to gifted mediums of occult perception. Venerable Pandit Subbaraya Sastry, who has left the legacy of manuscript treasures including “Vymanika Shastra”, was a simple, orthodox, intellectual Brahmin with spiritual gifts, who was esteemed by all who knew him, Englishmen and anglicised or educated Indians, in various walks of life. He was a walking lexicon gifted with occult perception. His sole aim was to transmit his knowledge to posterity. He lived a life of poverty, like Socrates, and sought no gains for himself.

In 1885 Mr. B. Suryanarain Rao, B.Sc., M. R. A. S., distinguished Astrologer and Editor, first met him and became his devoted exponent. In 1911 he started a Magazine in Madras named “Bhowthika Kalaa Nidhi,” or “Treasure house of physical sciences”, and published extracts from the revelations of the venerable scholar. We are in possession of 6 issues of that rare Journal which came to us by Divine grace. On 1-8-1918 he began to dictate “Vymanika Shastra” to Mr. Venkatachala Sarma, who took down the whole in 23 exercise books up to 23-8-1923. That gave manuscript shape to Maharshi Bharadwaja’s “Vymanika Sastra”. Then by a flash of genius he engaged a draughtsman, and got drawings of some varieties of the Vimanas prepared under his instructions, which form an indispensable adjunct to the manuscript proper. That was in 1923. India was then under British rule. Gandhi’s Non-co-operation movement was catching fire. And, it is said, Pandit Subbaraya Sastry was arrested! Yeoman efforts procured his release. But his activities had to remain confined. In 1928 he addressed a letter to the Maharaja of Darbbanga for aid in publication of the manuscripts. But the rich in India have got deaf ears, and warped minds! Then, disappointed and broken-hearted, in the early 30’s, venerable Subbaraya Sastry passed out of this world, and left it the poorer thereby! For some 20 years his literary treasures remained as under frigidaire, guarded by his daughter and young Mr. Venkatrama Sastry. Then the Unseen Powers began to play, and the manuscripts were released to light. And at last it has pleased God to enable us to present Maharshi Bharadwaja’s “Vymanika Sastra” to the world’s elite, and pay our tribute to the memories of Maharshi Bharadwaja and venerable Subbaraya Sastry. We thank God for His gracious favour. We thank Mr. Venkatrama Sastry who made the manuscript available to us; our first son, G. S. Josyer, M.A., B.ED., who contacted Mr. Venkatrama Sastry and brought the Mss., prepared it for the press, and even composed a portion of the Mss., and met an untimely death in the midst of his useful career; our younger son, G. N. Josyer; B.E., who has been helping us in seeing the work through; and our consultants in the course of the work, Sris. Alwar Tirumaliengar and M. A. Tirunarayan, B.E., M.I.E., M. N. Srinivasan, B.Sc, Hons, LL.B., Professor M. A. Tirunarayanan, D.Sc, and Sris M. C. S. Chari, B.Sc., N. Narasimhan, B.E., R. T. Krishnan, B.E., Pandit K. Ramaswamy Iyengar, and Mr. N. N. Sastry of P.T.I., and other associates and assistants.